Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Creating a Winning Corporate Culture Through People Power



Guest post from Eric Tetuan:

Creating a winning company culture starts with an investment in people. Not just investing in staff, but in relationships with clients as well as the people you serve. It requires having a deep understanding of human connections, of bonds, and of ways to break down barriers. Adopting a policy focused on people can make the difference in achieving successful outcomes. Employees who feel understood and appreciated are often more productive and willing go that extra mile on behalf of a client. It is one of the reasons why we receive repeat business and why our clients trust us with their biggest moments. It is also the reason for our high employee retention rate, and the lasting friendships amongst our staff members.
While every company is different, adopting values that speak to your core beliefs will not only help you attract quality candidates it will help build a sense of unity in the workplace. Develop initiatives that not only support your company’s mission but will improve the lives of your employees and the world around them. Inspire transformational thinking and experimentation amongst your staff, challenge them to think outside the box. Through collaboration, great minds can come together to tackle your toughest challenges advancing what’s possible. Design programs that not only do good in the community but improve motivation and communication within the office. Ask staff members to champion a cause that is near and dear to them, from donating their time at a soup kitchen, to ensuring that their coworkers are content. It is this culture of caring, of working for a greater good, that unites a staff and compels them to be the best they can be both personally and professionally. It will foster a spirit of collaboration, one where individuals share their knowledge to help their colleagues, and where professional development pays off. By creating a smarter workforce, you are creating a team able to produce amazing results on behalf of your clients, your partners as well as your consumers.

5 Tips to a Winning Work Culture:

The Power of People
Make your people feel that they are the heart and soul of your culture. It will ensure that your team feels connected to your mission, supported as individuals and that they feel appreciated for the work that they do. Recognizing that your employees spend more than one-third of their time in the workplace, create programs that are geared toward increasing employee satisfaction and promoting health and well-being. Offer in office exercise classes, healthy cooking classes, celebrate together with happy hours.  Boost office morale with staff appreciation days where you can pamper them with a catered lunch, spa treatments or present them with a small gift. By showing your team that you care about their well-being, it will result in increased job satisfaction and productivity. An investment in happier employees ultimately manifests in happier clients and consumers.

Honoring the Environment
Ask your employees to contribute to a better world. Find ways to protect the environment both in and out of the office. Create policies that promote energy efficiency, reduce waste and water conservation. Recycle plastics, aluminum, e-waste, and consider composting leftover lunches. Find ways to divert and donate old office furniture, add dimmable occupancy sensors in conference rooms, and use programmable controls for lights and thermostats. Simply asking your employees to turn off all of the lights before leaving can make a huge difference in energy conservation and how they feel about the environment.

Giving Back
Create a culture of giving. Support causes and organizations that can make a difference in your community by donating your time, money, or left-over materials. Share knowledge and resources that can help someone achieve their goal.  Empower your team to get involved with relief efforts and educational programs, create a mentorship program, or donate labor. Create a culture where PTO is available for employees to make a difference and effect change. By inspiring your team to get involved, they will become more engaged not only with the company, but with their peers in pursuit of improving the lives of those around them.

Innovation + Collaboration
Finding a pathway to improvement starts with an in-depth understanding of your challenges. Circulate surveys and collect honest feedback, use your deficiencies as a tool to find new solutions. Experiment with a variety of options, assign a team to explore and test theories, give them the freedom and space to become invested in the outcome. Empower your team by listening and acknowledging. A team that communicates well becomes a powerful tool to implement change.  

Knowledge is Power
Invest in your people. Provide employees with unique opportunities to advance their careers through education, training and certification. Host training workshops to assist teams in finding solutions to their toughest challenges. Support an employee’s quest for knowledge by letting them attend relevant seminars, webinars, help them stay at the top of their field with select conferences. Host lunch + Learns with deep insights into relevant topics and needed skills, create a library filled with resources to help your staff elevate their game.

Ultimately, by investing in people you are investing in a culture that supports personal growth and fuels productivity. A team that is able to come together to innovate and collaborate in exciting new ways that can impact on your bottom line. You are investing in a company culture that is better able to support your corporate mission, in an empowered team who is ready to assist clients and consumers with a transformational energy that can greatly improve your bottom line.


Co-founder and chief innovative officer at productionglue, Eric Tetuan has built his impressive technical portfolio over 25 years in New York City production. His skills reflect many different technical roles, including “in the trenches” experience.
As the company evolved, Eric’s focus turned to supporting growth, maintaining project performance, and overseeing office culture. Productionglue has seen a double-digit revenue increase for over a decade. Eric oversees the management of all of the processes to ensure that productionglue can deliver the best possible results. He established an internal review process (the “g-brief") to learn from projects and improve the way we work, in real time.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Great Leadership: The Power of I’s


Guest post from Bob Nelson:

In my new book, 1,001 Ways to Engage Employees (Career Press) I examine the top ten factors that most impact employee engagement in order of their priority, according to a regression analysis of 3 million employee surveys, and then provide specific real-life examples of what each factor looks like in practice in successful companies today.

Not surprising, I found that one of the most significant drivers of employee engagement is One’s Immediate Manager and all aspects that make up that relationship between a manager and his or her employees, that is, the bond that is created by effective leaders with those they lead. 

The best leaders demonstrate their long-term commitment to their employees through the specific behaviors they display on a daily basis.  Better yet, the most important behaviors leaders can do to develop and maintain motivated, engaged employees tend to have little or no cost, but rather are a function of the daily interactions that managers have with employees pertaining to work in the context of each employees’ jobs.

I remember some of the most important themes great leaders provide from the first letter of the word, which I call “The Power of the I’s”:

Interesting and Important Work—Everyone should have at least part of their job be of high interest to them. As the management theorist Frederick Herzberg once said, “If you want someone to do a good job, give them a good job to do.” Yes, some jobs may be inherently boring, but you can give anyone in such a job at least one task or project that’s stimulating to that person. Name him or her to a suggestion committee that meets once a week, or to some other special group. The time away from the regular job is likely to be more than made up with increased productivity.

Information, Communication and Feedback on Performance—With presumed employment for life largely a thing of the past, employees want more than ever to know how they are doing in their jobs and how the company is doing in its business. Start telling them how the company makes money and how it spends money. Make sure there are ample channels of communication to encourage employees to be informed, ask questions and share information. At least some of the communication channels should directly involve management in non-intimidating circumstances. Soon you’ll have them turning out the lights when they’re last to leave a room.

Involvement in Decisions and a Sense of Ownership—Involving employees—especially in decisions that affect them—is both respectful to them and practical. People that are closest to the problem or the customer typically have the best insight as to how a situation can be improved. They know what works and what doesn’t, but often are never asked for their opinion. As you involve others, you increase their commitment and ease in implementing any new idea or change.

Independence, Autonomy and Flexibility—Most employees—especially experienced, top-performing employees—value being given room to do their job as they best see fit. All employees also appreciate having flexibility in their jobs. When you provide these factors to employees based on desired performance, it increases the likelihood that they will perform as desired—and bring additional initiative, ideas and energy to the job as well.

Increased Opportunity for Learning, Growth and Responsibility—Everyone appreciates a manager who gives credit where it is due. The chances to share the successes of employees with others throughout the organization are almost limitless. In addition, most employee development is on-the-job development that comes from new learning opportunities and the chance to gain new skills and experience. Giving employees new opportunities to perform, learn and grow as a form of recognition and thanks is very motivating to most employees.

Behind all of these themes is a basic premise of trust and respect and having the best interests of your employees at heart. You will never get the best effort from employees today by building a fire under them; rather, you need to find a way to build a fire within them to obtain extraordinary results from your people.

Bob Nelson, Ph.D. is the leading authority on employee recognition, rewards and engagement in the world and has been named a Top Thought Leader by the Best Practice Institute. He has sold 5 million books on those topics, the latest of which is 1,001 WAYS TO ENGAGE EMPLOYEES: Help People Do Better What They Do Best (Career Press).