Thursday, May 17, 2018

See the Big Picture to Succeed as a CEO

Guest post from Professor M.S.Rao, Ph.D.:
 
“To be a champion, I think you have to see the big picture. It’s not about winning and losing; it’s about every day hard work and about thriving on a challenge. It’s about embracing the pain that you’ll experience at the end of a race and not being afraid. I think people think too hard and get afraid of a certain challenge.” —Summer Sanders

CEOs must see the upcoming organizational challenges from multiple perspectives with a big picture. They must be able to integrate their conceptual skills with technical and business acumen. Seeing the big picture can help avert organizational challenges and overcome them. Additionally, they must be able to forecast the future demands of the customers and clients to create products and services. The visionary CEOs like Richard Branson, Warren Buffett and Lou Gerstner have an innate ability to see the big picture. They could see what others could not.

Robert Katz and Conceptual Skills
Robert Katz outlines three levels of management—low, middle and top level management. At each level of management, there is a need for technical skills, human skills and conceptual skills. At the low level management, there is need for more technical skills and less conceptual skills. At the middle level management, there is equal need for technical skills, conceptual skills and human skills. At the top level management, there is more need for conceptual skills and less need for technical skills as the leaders involve in strategic management. And the need for human skills remains in the same proportion at all levels of management. Hence, leaders and chief executives must possess conceptual skills to see what cannot be seen by others. They must be able to vision and make decisions accordingly.

Leadership Lessons from Warren Buffett
Warren Buffett is one of the world’s richest men. He is the legendary chairman and CEO of the biggest shareholder company—Berkshire Hathaway headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, United States. He is an investor and philanthropist. He has received several honors and recognition including top money manager of the 20th century in a survey by the Carson Group and Presidential Medal of Freedom, 2011. He saw the big picture and invested in companies reaping a great harvest. Hence, we will discuss about Warren Buffet, the Oracle of Omaha and his leadership lessons. He is good at numbers with an eye for detail. He is a long-term player with a clear focus on his investments. Warren Buffett believed both in timing and time. He knew the right time to invest in the right companies. He made many mistakes while investing, and he advises youngsters and college students to invest wisely. Here are some leadership lessons from him:

  • Be a voracious reader. He reads and reflects a lot. He reflects on the decisions he made in the past to assess and improve as per the present conditions.
  • Be patient and persistent. He has lots of patience. He is an expert in numbers and analyses them thoroughly. He doesn’t give up.
  • Articulate your ideas and insights effectively with others. He knows how to articulate his ideas with others. He influences his team with his ideas and carries them along with him.
  • Identify the strengths of people and build the team accordingly.
  • He gives his team members adequate “freedom to do by themselves” to run the organization.
  • Associate with people who are smarter than you to improve yourself. Right ambience leads to right ideas and insights to add value in attitude, behavior and performance.
  • Everyone makes mistakes. But we must learn lessons from mistakes and move on to make better decisions in future.
  • Be clear and strong in fundamentals. He has clarity in his mind and invests in fundamentals. He is unmoved by market fluctuations. His investments are meant for long-term results.
  • Learn when to hold and when to fold. He knows when to hold and fold his stocks.
  • Lead a simple life. He believes in simple living and high thinking. He still lives in the same house that he originally purchased for just over thirty-one thousand dollars, and he owns one car. He leads frugally and enjoys McDonald’s hamburgers and cherry Coke.
  • Emphasize ethical values. He is very transparent in his dealings. He emphasizes more on “means” rather than “ends.” He once remarked, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.”
  • Make a difference to the world. He shares his profits through philanthropic activities to make a difference in the lives of others. He is a great philanthropist.
How to Develop a Big Picture Thinking?
 We often come across two types of people in our life—the “big picture people” and the “details people.” The big picture people are highly creative and innovative. They are visionaries. They see what others cannot. In contrast, the details people often emphasize numbers and cannot move forward unless they are convinced by those numbers. You can develop the big picture thinking easily. Here are some tools and techniques to develop it:


  • Find out your biological clock and work on your passionate areas.
  • Break into small pieces; work on them independently; and then integrate them to acquire the big picture.
  • Work beyond your domain to widen your horizons.
  • Meet people outside your area of interest.
  • Discuss with people to generate more ideas and then work on execution.
  • Travel to different places and meet new people as it enables you to integrate different experiences to develop a broad mindset.
  • Invest some time to reflect every day. It helps you overcome your busy tasks and unclogs your mind.
  • Be in solitude as solitude is fortitude. Go to a serene place to think things through. Don’t allow any thoughts to enter into your mind. It helps you think from new perspectives.
  • Take role models who are good at big picture. Find out how they overcame their challenges by looking at a big picture.
  • Think big, dream big, create a blueprint and then break it into actionable steps to achieve it.
Remember, the journey of thousand miles starts with a single step. Hence, take the first step to build your big picture thinking.

Conclusion

 It is essential in the current competitive world to see the big picture to avert organizational challenges. Hence, leaders and CEOs must learn lessons from Warren Buffett to see the big picture to minimize organizational challenges and maximize organizational effectiveness.  

Author Bio:
Professor M.S.Rao, Ph.D. is the Father of “Soft Leadership” and Founder of MSR Leadership Consultants, India. He is an International Leadership Guru with 37 years of experience and the author of 37 books including the award-winning 21 Success Sutras for CEOs. He is a C-Suite advisor and a sought-after keynote speaker globally. He is passionate about serving and making a difference in the lives of others. He shares his leadership wisdom freely with the world on his four blogs. His vision is to build one million students as global leaders by 2030.  He is a dynamic, energetic and inspirational leadership speaker. He can be reached at: msrlctrg@gmail.com.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Intergenerational Leadership Begins with Us: We Have More in Common Than We Thought

Guest post by Mark H. Fowler & Noal McDonald:


Leadership is a complex idea: one that is not consistently easy to wrap our minds around.

We know good leadership when we see it. Most of us have experienced great leaders somewhere in our lives. It could have been at work, in school, on the athletic field or with a group of friends. If we think of what these experiences have in common, we might think of this quote by Harold Koontz and Cyril O’Donnell: “Leadership molds individuals into a team.”

With this interpretation, let’s look at challenges leaders face in today’s workplace.

There are more generations in the workplace than ever before. With more data and research on generational characteristics than in the past, it can lead us to greater segregation and dissonance. Characteristics are often applied across the board to individuals based on age.

Millennials are often at the forefront of all this analysis and have been researched, written about and discussed more than any previous generation. We’ve given them attributes that can separate them out and may put them at odds with non-millennial groups in the workplace.

How can a leader lead across generational divides? Before we tackle that thorny question, let’s look at the generations from a different perspective. A recent
study by IBM shows that the generations are more similar than different on certain issues.

Results from 1,784 employees in 12 countries and six industries show that the generations are only a few percentage points different when asked about the importance of some of the characteristics we attribute to millennials, including:

 - Meaningful work: wanting purpose, not just a paycheck; managing work/life balance.


- Leadership characteristics: desiring a boss who provides hands-on feedback and guidance.

- Leave jobs for same reasons: advancement, money, opportunity (millennials are considered job hoppers, but in the survey, 75 per cent had been in their current jobs for more than three years).

- Everyone gets a trophy: teams and working collaboratively had more rating gaps, with 64 per cent of Gen X saying everyone on a successful team should be rewarded, while millennials and boomers were 55 per cent and 42 per cent, respectively.


Perhaps we have more in common than we thought. Maybe people don’t fit so well in boxes.

Based on the IBM research, the majority of the workforce, regardless of generation, holds the same beliefs that engagement is best produced by leaders who can:

- Communicate the organization’s vision.

- Encourage collaboration and innovation.

- Help individuals see their connection and purpose within the organization.

 People throughout industries and across generations are looking for leaders who have:

- Humanity and humility with courage and transparency to ask for honest feedback and diligence to make changes.

- Openness to diverse ideas and ability to encourage cooperation and collaboration.

- Ability to have authentic conversations that engage others and create a space where all can contribute their best talents and be honored for their contribution.

Leaders, wherever they are in the organization, can build great teams using these characteristics.


What is becoming more apparent as we look at successful organizations is that leadership does not reside only in the C-suite, but can add value throughout. We can all demonstrate leadership characteristics with peers, co-workers and teams as well as with our leaders. Each of us can lead in his/her own way. It can be as simple as leading with an idea that could mean success for everyone. It can mean leading a discussion where it is clear that everyone is welcome, if not required, to participate.

Success comes from our ability to connect one-on-one while building trust and relationships. Leaders and individuals work best when they can connect on common ground and engage with each other to create the best outcome. Each generation, each individual, regardless of place or role, has something of value to contribute to the success of the business.

This is a tall order for anyone. How can we accomplish all of this? It starts with our conversations.

There is art and science to the kind of conversations that can have the impact we need in our organizations today. While we can spend a lifetime improving our skills, here are two ideas to help us be better leaders wherever we are.

Coming alongside

Take the lead by being the first to come alongside others to see what we can constructively accomplish together. Coming alongside is not about relinquishing your ideas; it is about learning how to incorporate and collaborate with each other and equally participating for the ultimate goal. We can engage through honoring accomplishments, understanding what everyone has to say and attempting to know what it is like to walk in their shoes. Effective leaders are able to set aside their agendas and embrace that others have just as much to add to the situation.

Being on the same page

This is about making sure that everyone truly understands a project and its goals. Reaching out to ensure that everyone is heard and is able to support the decision will prevent surprises down the line. The process builds relationships and connections that strengthen any team.


By adding these two concepts as the foundation of our conversations, we can become leaders in every situation. We will build trust, stronger relationships and commitments to achieve mutual goals.

We can all lead together. It will pay many dividends. With leaders across all generations and in all levels of the organization, we can create a culture where everyone can thrive. You will be more than surprised.


Author Bios:

Noal McDonald is co-author of
Revolutionary Conversations: The Tools You Need for the Success You Want. As a Co-CEO of Revolutionary Conversations, LLC, she develops and delivers courses and workshops for corporations and strategic alliances that want to enhance engagement, create collaborative cultures and improve employee performance.

Mark H. Fowler is the president of Stowe Management Corporation and Co-CEO of Revolutionary Conversations, LLC. He is a business growth and corporate re-engineering expert, author and writer, business educator, public speaker and change leader.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Working on Working Together

Guest post by Chad Littlefield and Will Wise:

Vulnerability is natural. It’s human—so much so that the word “human” is often used to point out or help us come to terms with our vulnerabilities.

So when we enter a new situation, we often search for something to protect us. If we’re at a party filled with people we largely don’t know, we’ll seek out the person we do, at least until we’ve adjusted and are comfortable mingling with others. Online, we might edit our tweets and posts before sending them out to the world based on how we think others will react to them.

As a result of our vulnerability, we instinctively build walls to protect us from others we don’t already trust, but those walls also prevent connection and all of the positives that come from it.

Imagine you want to work with a new employee so you give them a project to spearhead with your input—let’s say you’ve want them to work with you on the task of reducing the number of meetings that take place around the office on a weekly basis, either by consolidating smaller meetings into fewer, larger ones or by determining which can be cut altogether.

Likely, your initial interactions with this employee in pursuit of solving this problem will follow these simple steps:

1. You’ll shake hands and introduce yourselves

2. Then you will then take turns brainstorming potential solutions to the problem at hand—mostly small tweaks to current policies and activities in the office.

3. For each suggestion one of you makes, the other explains why it wouldn’t work or what in it is useful. This goes back and forth until a consensus is reached on a middle ground, “safe option,” and you both go on your way.

Seems like a pretty straightforward, common work interaction a new employee and their manager. But you can do better, right off the bat, if you prioritize connection when leading. Before jumping into solutions for the project, establish a relationship of trust that will allow you to be more comfortable with each other—it’s especially important for an employee to feel comfortable and able to express their opinions and ideas with their superiors (creating that kind of environment is just great leadership).

Ask them a question that is outside of the realm of “small talk.” Ask (respectfully) about something their wearing or carrying based on your curiosity, or ask the story behind an interesting tchotchke on their desk you saw when you walked past it in the morning. Have them share a little bit about themselves—not their role at the company or their role before it, but who they are regardless of where they’re sitting—and share some of your own as well. Staring with an ask that began with natural, genuine curiosity, an urge to connect will be fostered in both parties.

By building this rapport, you will be focused on working together, on truly collaborating, instead of simply solving a problem, and ironically that means that any solution you come up with will be far better because it’s one that is fully using the power of two brains collaborating. You can create something entirely new that has never been done before, something you’ll both love and find yourself hoping the other team members will buy into it as well. Rather than one person having passion for their idea and the other going along with it, the solution is something you are both passionate about and will champion. 
You’ll know trust is high between you when you catch yourself or the employee things like “Our idea….” or “We’ve got this idea….” rather than “My idea is…” or “I got this idea…” The “me” moments shift to “we” moments when an idea is born and then built upon in the space between multiple individuals.
 
If we connect before diving into content with our colleagues and those we lead, we will spend less time shooting down ideas and will be comfortable enough to listen and build on the ideas of others. Peter Block once said that “without relatedness, no work can occur.” Creativity and innovation happens best in an environment of psychological safety where we trust that those we are working with have our best interest in mind. When we don’t feel the need to put up walls, true collaboration can happen.

 
WiLL WiSE, M.Ed., is the author of #1 Amazon Bestselling Book, Asking Powerful Questions: Create Conversations that Matter. He has over two decades of experience
custom building leadership programs for corporate and nonprofit groups. Leaders call Will when there is a lack of trust getting in the way of results. Tens of thousands of people have been empowered with positive communication skills after spending some time with WiLL and We!™.

Chad Littlefield, M.Ed. is the co-founder and CEO of We!™, keynote speaker and professional facilitator. Leaders and conference organizers call Chad when they want to make their events more interactive and engaging. He has spoken at TEDx and is the creator of We! Connect Cards™, which are now being used to create conversations that matter on campuses and companies in over 50 countries around the world.