Friday, March 2, 2012

6 Ways Leaders Are Different


Guest post by By Mark Miller, Co-author of Great Leaders Grow: Becoming a Leader for Life:

For more than a decade, I've used the metaphor of an iceberg to talk about leadership -- the 10% above the water line represents the skills of the leader and the 90% below represents their character. The Secret, a book I co-authored with Ken Blanchard, outlines what we believe great leaders do -- the skills part of the picture. However, the question I have gotten consistently ever since we started using the iceberg illustration is this, "What are the character traits of great leaders?"

On more than one occasion, I have answered the character question by asking, "What are the traits you are trying to instill in your children?" Typical responses would include: dependability, honesty, integrity and hard work. I would say, "That's what leaders need." Now that I look back, my answer was incorrect. Dependability, honesty, integrity and hard work are needed by EVERY employee -- including the leaders; therefore, none of these are distinctive of leaders.

So the first question I've been wrestling with is: Are leaders really different? My answer is yes. Clearly, we all want our leaders to be dependable, honest, show integrity and be hard working, but our organizations demand more and so do we. Therefore, my second question has been -- How are leaders different?

Here's a short list of six attributes that I believe you're more likely to see in leaders than non-leaders. It is not an exhaustive list, but most of the great leaders I've known personally, and those I've studied, have demonstrated some measure of the following traits.


Optimism -- Men and women in leadership are generally optimistic. They see a preferred future and can envision a path to make it a reality – despite the obstacles.

Judgment -- The best leaders have the ability to make good decisions – even when the data is incomplete.

Ownership -- Great leaders are willing to take responsibility for their actions, the actions of those they lead and the outcomes of their efforts.

Initiative -- Good leaders are known for being proactive. They are willing to act – and often, they are the first to act.

Courage -- To lead well requires bold decisions, decisive decisions - to stand alone if necessary. To lead well requires courage.

Servanthood -- The best leaders are motivated by a heart to serve. They want to serve the organization, their people, their customers and all their stakeholders.

What character traits do you see in the best leaders?

© 2012 Mark Miller, co-author of Great Leaders Grow: Becoming a Leader for Life

Mark Miller, co-author of Great Leaders Grow: Becoming a Leader for Life, is vice president, training and development, for Chick-fil-A. During his career he has served in corporate communications, restaurant operations, quality and customer satisfaction, and numerous other leadership positions. He began his Chick-fil-A career in 1977 working as an hourly team member. He is the author of The Secret of Teams and is the coauthor of The Secret: What Great Leaders Know and Do with Ken Blanchard.

For more information please visit http://greatleadersgrow.com/ and http://greatleadersserve.org/ 

3 comments:

Mads Singers said...

One thing I think you have forgot is that each leader have a unique set of values - a world view if you will.

Debra said...

I think Dr. Ann Mcswain, Associate Professor at Lincoln University summarizes your blog entry in a few sentences - "Leadership is about capacity - the capacity of leaders to listen and observe, to use their expertise as a starting point to encourage dialogue between all levels of decision-making, to establish processes and transparency in decision-making, to articulate their own values and visions clearly but not impose them. Leadership is about setting and not just reacting to agendas, identifying problems, and initiating change that makes for substantial improvement rather than managing change.”

Excellent reading by the way ;)

Rob Moore said...

I think you summed it up pretty well! Everything that keeps flowing to my mind right now falls under one of the categories you mentioned. I would like to add that leaders do things for the greater good and never for themselves. Thanks for sharing!