Thursday, September 20, 2018

How Effective is Your Communication?


Guest post from David Hiatt:

Lack of effective communication skills has done more to keep good people from being promoted into leadership roles than any other skill deficiency.  I hope I have your attention because in over 30 years of working with managers and organizations, my experience is that a lack of effective communication skills has kept very talented and skilled people from becoming leaders.  They have this great knowledge and skill set for the job requirements but communicating in a manner to get positive outcomes from others was sorely lacking.

Communication is a basic human need.  Interacting with other humans has been the core of human progress throughout the ages.  Isolation and lack of human interaction will emotionally, mentally, and physically debilitate a person; as will ineffective conversations.  On the other end of the spectrum, when you communicate effectively and achieve more positive outcomes you enhance your sense of well-being.  I don’t know about you, but I know that I would prefer to think and feel better.  

Just because two or more people are talking with each other does not necessarily mean they are communicating. Communication requires several key skills and components.  Key components include understanding yourself and others, creating agreements about the conversation, emotional involvement (or lack of), attitude and beliefs, and your comfort zone. Skills include listening, and questioning.  If you want to achieve more positive outcomes with co-workers, or family and friends the above skills and components will improve your communication.

Understanding the other person can be key.  When you can identify the behavioral style or preferences of the other people with whom you communicate you are better able to adapt your message in such a way that the other people have a better chance of understanding you.  An example of this would be communicating with a Dominant Style who prefers, direct, to the point, task-oriented interactions and you want to chit-chat about the weather.  That Dominant person will not be engaged, and the odds of a positive outcome diminish. 

Another way to understand the others with whom you communicate is to determine if they are being emotional, judgmental, or just exchanging information; and then being self-aware enough to make sure that you are nurturing and sharing information without judgement or emotion.  It is okay to care enough to want a positive outcome but if you attempt to communicate when simply reacting to your or the other person’s emotions it is not unusual to find yourself in a shouting match with negative outcomes.

I have found that when you set goals and expectations for the important conversations you tend to get better results. What I mean is that the conversation should have an agreed upon purpose, confirmation of the time allotted, agreed upon agendas and expectations of people engaged in the conversation, and a goal or outcome at the end of the conversation.  When you add the component of a mutual agreement at the beginning of those important conversations you are better able to control the direction and therefore the outcome of the conversation.

Emotional involvement is double-edged.  As I mentioned earlier, you want to care enough to accomplish a positive outcome at the end of the conversation, yet you should not be communicating emotionally.  If you are communicating from your emotional ego-state, you will not be able to think objectively or to listen clearly.  Emotions will always cloud your thinking and cause you to say or to respond in a manner that will result in a less than positive outcome.

Your attitude and beliefs are intertwined with your self-concept and create your view of reality.  The important thing to remember is that the other person or people with whom you are communicating will not have the same view.  According to each person’s view, they are right.  Whatever beliefs you were taught or acquired throughout your life will become your definition of normal.  Your subconscious’ job is to keep you normal, whatever normal means to you.  Do a self-assessment of your attitudes and beliefs and decide which are still appropriate as an adult and which are hurting your efforts to be a more effective communicator.

Listening is a skill that much has been written about.  I urge you to read as much as you can on listening skills.  My experience has taught me that listening is much more than just looking at the other person and nodding my head! I must make sure that I am understanding what they are saying and the intention behind it.  This means the good listening skills should include good questioning skills. When you are unsure of what the other person is asking or saying you must ask them to clarify.  Be careful.  Your belief that it is rude to ask so many questions may prevent you from asking the key questions for real understanding, which, by the way, is what real listening is about.

David Hiatt is author of FROM THE BOARDROOM TO THE LIVING ROOM:  Communicate With Skill For Positive Outcomes. After 10 years of owning and operating a successful Sandler Training center, he was recruited by Sandler corporate to handle the bulk of national and international training through the Global Accounts division. With a BA and Masters in Communications, he is a passionate and energetic program leader who is truly concerned with helping others to grow, develop, and communicate.

Monday, September 17, 2018

How to Address Sticky Workplace Office Etiquette Issues


A Pennsylvania man was allegedly fired for farting too much at work. Seriously. Apparently he had some medical issues, and he’s now suing his former employer.

Given that I write advice for managers, my immediate reaction to this story was to put myself in the manager’s shoes who had to deal with this sensitive breach of office etiquette. How would you like to have that conversation?

According to the lawsuit, it went something like this: "We cannot run an office and have visitors with the odor in the office," and "We are having complaints from people who have problems with the odors." 

Unfortunately, as a manager, chances are, at some point in your career, you will have to deal with some kind of office etiquette issue. While it may not be excessive farting, it may be one of these:

1. Swearing. No, I’m not talking about politically incorrect language, although that seems to be making the headlines too these days. I’m talking about dropping “F-bombs” at work. Some would say that swearing at work depends on the culture. I happen to disagree. In my opinion, the use of the F word has no place in any work environment. A manager’s use of language sets a good or bad example, and overlooking it is the same as condoning it. Just be aware that the swearing may be a medical condition.

2. Too much aftershave or perfume. This one’s pretty common – it’s “that guy” who shows up for work in the morning after dousing himself with his favorite man-spray. This one’s a little more subjective, as some people are more sensitive to strong smells than others. I would tend to overlook it and chalk it up as more of a “pet peeve” (unless another employee is allergic to such odors). After all, the smell does eventually dissipate, and it’s not as bad as …….

3. Body odor and bad breadth. This one depends on type of work environment (outdoors vs. indoors), type of work (physical labor vs. office work) and proximity to co-workers and customers. And again, odor is subjective. While probably more than a pet peeve but perhaps not as serious as excessive farting, it’s something that a manager could at least discuss with the employee. The employee may not even know and again, it could be a medical condition.

4. Talking too loud. We had one of these at a former company I worked at. He was great at his job and a super nice guy. However, employees didn’t want to sit next to him because he was so loud on the phone. While there are some workarounds to this kind of thing, the manager may need to have a discussion about use of “indoor vs. outdoor” voice. It becomes even more of an issue if the loud phone calls are not even work related, i.e., arguing with a spouse or having an argument with the cable company.

5. Dress code violations. Some employees just don’t seem to know the difference between dressing for work and dressing for a night out clubbing. If just an individual employee, the issue can be handled with a little coaching on how to dress appropriately at work. Or, you may have to establish a formal dress code policy.

For any of these sceneries, you first need to decide if the issue is just a “pet peeve” or a legitimate performance issue. See Are You Managing or Just Nagging? to learn more.

Here are two acid test questions:

1. Can I make a clear connection between the behavior (or lack of) and the performance output?

2. If the behavior doesn’t stop (or start), are you willing to take progressive disciplinary action, up to and including termination?

If your answer is “yes” to both, then it’s a performance issue, and needs to be dealt with. See How to Discuss an Employee Performance Problem to learn how.

In any of these scenarios, I would suggest that the manager consults with their human resources representative. They all contain potential landmines (ADA, harassment, discrimination, etc.), so it’s better to be cautious and smart instead of making a mistake that gets you and your company in legal hot water.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Leaders Returning to their First Love

Guest post by Janet Britcher:

Entrepreneurship: Exploring


When professionals demonstrate excellence in their chosen field, they are often promoted to
leadership, leaving behind their foundational expertise and for some, their first love. Some scientists give up the joys of the lab, some physicians the satisfaction of clinical work with patients, some cooks give up the creativity in the kitchen, for leadership or entrepreneurship. Can you have it all? I recently interviewed restaurant co-owner Rob Evans. He and his wife Nancy Pugh own and run the wildly successful Duckfat Restaurant in Portland Maine.

Leadership Learning

Due to the growth of his restaurants, Rob Evans developed leadership skills which enabled him to move out of the kitchen. He was motivated to learn how to be a good leader to keep serving more customers. Working with consultants from GISC, he deepened his commitment to quality workplace by honing his own management skills. In order to delegate more effectively, he arranged for his managers to develop their leadership skills further as well. Despite a natural tension between the front of the house and the kitchen (in other industries, that tension is between operations and sales) his retention rate is unusually high, over 80% of employees have been there over five years.

Entrepreneur: Return to the First Love

Now in addition to Duckfat, Rob has been called by his love of cooking back to the kitchen. Entrepreneurs are creators and risk takers, and by building a strong management team, Rob was able to consider what else he wanted for his role. Prior to opening Duckfat in 2006 with his wife Nancy Pugh, they owned and managed a high-end restaurant, Hugo’s. So he knows a range of restaurant offerings.

This new opportunity provides space for a production kitchen to support the high volume in the small space of Duckfat. In addition, he has a creative new offering: Duckfat Frites. It is located next to a Brewery, Oxbow, where customers can buy a beer and then order Belgian style Frites to go.  The production space is new, the informal partnership with a brewery is new, and the take-out window for Duckfat Frites is new. Entrepreneurs thrive on creativity and all leaders need to find ways to tap into innovation and make time for activities which are energizing.

His motivation?  “I wanted to be back in the kitchen, and developing my managers enabled me to do that. Duckfat serves up to 800 customers a day, in peak season. In order to be able to serve that many people, and coordinate our 40 employees, we need a good management structure and systems. We have worked hard to create that. Now I’m ready for a return to the hands-on work in the kitchen.”

Transplanting Culture

The new location, Duckfat Frites, has its own culture. Initially Rob thought it would be a copy of their successful Duckfat culture, but the nature of the work they do, the location and the space have combined to create something different. Still good, still positive and connected, yet with its own flair. Culture is hard to transplant, as any company which has been through a merger can attest. What did transfer was the positive spirit and collegiality.

Keeping Vibrant

Some leaders find the move into management to be satisfying expansion of skills, and discover a new passion for strategy, developing others, and leveraging impact. Others long for their prior kind of work, where they had expertise and more hands-on satisfaction. Either one can represent career advancement and development. I’m a fan of playing to strengths, and spending time and energy where there is creativity and passion. That plus focus translates into success, on either path. Some fortunate leaders like Rob Evans find a way to combine both.

Some executives ask, how do I know which would be better? As an executive coach, I have seen that self-reflection has a big payoff. It’s important to nourish what is enlivening, whether that’s through growth, expansion, diversification or a return to your first professional love.  For those who invest in reflection and self-awareness, it’s even possible to combine both.

Janet Britcher, MBA, is President of Transformation Management LLC in Boston. She offers executive coaching, leadership workshops, and retreat facilitation. www.transformationmanagement.com.

Monday, September 10, 2018

50 Development Ideas for the 9 Box Performance and Potential Matrix

When using the performance and potential matrix (9 box) to assess leaders, some organizations will assess each employee, then discuss development at a follow-up meeting, or worst case, not at all.

An emerging best practice is to discuss specific development strategies for each employee as a part of the assessment discussion. That way, information concerning strengths and weaknesses is fresh in everyone’s minds and it’s a natural transition to move to strategies to move each employee to the next level of readiness.

While there may not be time to discuss every employee on the 9 box grid, high potential employee development should be discussed. These are the employees that will probably end up on succession planning lists, so it makes sense to involve the entire leadership team in brainstorming development strategies for these employees.

Here are general development guidelines for each of the nine boxes. These are of course just general guidelines, and judgment needs to be applied depending on context and the unique needs of the individual leader.

I would also caution against the temptation to come up with cute labels for each of the nine boxes (i.e., “rising stars”, or “steady performers”), or a list of descriptive characteristics for each of the nine boxes. These labels and/or descriptors will typically just cause confusion and add little value to the discussion.

1A (high potential, high performance):

·         Stretch assignments, things they don’t already know how to do, assignments that take them beyond their current role; high profile, where stakes are high

·         Give them a “start-up” assignment, something no one has done, a new product, process, territory, etc…

·         Give them a “fix-it” assignment, a chance to step in and solve a problem or repair someone else’s mess

·         Job change, rotations, job swaps, - an opportunity to experience a brand new role, short term or long term

·         Help them build cross-functional relationships with other A players

·         Find them a mentor – at least one level up. Provide an internal or external coach
Access to exclusive training opportunities

·         Access to meetings, committees, etc… one level up; exposure to senior managers, VPs; advisory Councils, Board of Directors

·         Watch out for signs of burnout

·         Watch for signs of retention risks; know how to “save” a hi-po

·         Next level up exposure, responsibilities, shadowing

2A (high performance, moderate potential):

·         Development activities similar to 1A

·         Difference is often degree of “readiness” for larger roles. Development is preparation for longer term opportunities

·         Continue to assess for potential

3A (high performance, limited potential):

·         Ask what motivates them and how they want to develop

·         Provide recognition, praise, and rewards

·         Provide opportunities to develop in current role, to grow deeper and broader capabilities and knowledge

·         Provide honest feedback about their opportunities for advancement if asked

·         Watch for signs of retention risks; know how to “save” a “hi-pro” (high professional)

·         Ask them to mentor, teach, and coach others

·         Allow them to share what they know, presentations at company meetings, external conferences, to be “the highly valued expert”

1B (good/average performance, high potential):

·         Development activities similar to 1A

·         Difference is current performance level

·         Focus more on competency gaps that will move them from B to A performance; good to great performance

·         Provide candid feedback and express your confidence

2B: (good/average performance, moderate potential):

·         May not be eager or able to advance; don’t push them, allow them to stay where they are

·         Continuously check-in regarding willingness to advance, relocate

·         Provide occasional opportunities to “test” them

·         Provide stretch assignments

·         Provide coaching and training

·         Help them move from “good to great”

·         Tell them they are valued

·         Listen to their ideas

·         Praise their accomplishments

·         Trust them

3B (good/average performance, limited potential):

·         Combination of performance management, training, and coaching to help them move from “OK to good”

·         Provide honest feedback about their opportunities for advancement if asked

1C (poor performance, high potential):

·         Find out the root cause of poor performance and together develop an action plan to improve

·         Consider moving the high potential to a different role (may have been a poor fit)
Provide additional support, resources

·         Look for ways to “attach” to 1As, 1Bs, or 2As

·         After a “reasonable” period of time, if performance does not improve, then re-examine your potential assessment

2C (often used for leaders too new to rate):

·         Focus is on onboarding, orientation, relationship building

·         Provide a peer mentor

·         Provide formal new leader training
 
3C (poor performance, limited potential):

·         Use a performance management approach, not a developmental approach
Improvement action plan vs. an IDP

·         Clarify expectations

·         Identify and remove “blockers”, poor performers that are standing in the way of high potentials

·         Provide clearly defined goals

·         Be explicit about the ways in which they must improve

·         Provide remedial coaching and feedback

·         After trying all of the above, after a ”reasonable” amount of time, move the person out of the role. Dismiss or move to individual contributor role

Need help with your own talent review meeting and creating robust leadership development plans? I’ve run hundreds of them. Contact me to discuss.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

How to Be A Leader As An Individual Contributor

Guest post from Pam Didner:

When I speak at conferences, I frequently talk to young marketers. One common question they ask is “As an individual contributor, how can I be a leader, if I don’t ‘lead’ a team?” It certainly would be nice if you have a team that you can lead, but it’s not absolutely necessary. I tell them that the pre-requisite of leadership is not having a team to “lead.” Leadership comes in different facets. One of them is how you conduct yourself doing your job or working with your peers.

Here are 5 ways to become an effective leader as an individual contributor:

1. Know your strengths to provide value-add

You need to have a strong grasp of your own strengths. Working on a project is like playing a soccer game. To play a game effectively, you need to know what position(s) you want to play: defense, midfield or attack. Understanding your own strengths allows you to inform the project lead where he or she can better place you within a team. Most of the time, the placement is based on your current job scope. For example, you get pulled into a project because of your role in IT. Your engagement for the project is likely related to what you are doing in the IT department.


Say there is a project to source a technology vendor for a new marketing program and nobody on the team is responsible for vendor research. If your strength happens to be in conducting research, you can volunteer to take on the responsibility to showcase your expertise.

Yes, it’s more work, but it’s also an opportunity to demonstrate what else you can do, in addition to providing insights related to IT. Once you complete the research and provide your findings and recommendations, your team will come to look to you for answers.

Being a subject matter expert is one way to demonstrate leadership.

2. Tie your projects to business goals

Most of young individual contributors are very good at getting things done. That is great, but that is not good enough if you want to be a leader. One leadership trait is that you need to be able to articulate the impact of what you accomplish in the context of business goals or revenue.

Do you know your company’s or your group’s business goals? Can you quantify your contribution to the project in relationship to overall business goals? The ability to crystalize your contribution shows that you can think like senior managers and communicate in a way that they can understand. Consequently, you can help rally others to communicate their accomplishments in a results-driven manner. In a way, you lead by example.

3. Comprehend organizational structure, processes and decision makers

Most individual contributors only know their direct managers and team members. It’s important to know how your team fits into the overall corporate machine. Understand how your team works with other teams and who your key internal stakeholders are. Having that holistic view can shape conversations with your management and suggest ideas on how to better support your stakeholders.

Even though a company has a corporate culture, each business or product group can have its own vibe with unique processes and key influencers. This is tribal knowledge and usually is not documented anywhere. Being “in the know” shows that you know how to maneuver within organizations to get things done.

4. Plan and execute

Individual contributors usually focus on tactical execution. The overall mentality from individual contributors is “tell me what needs to be done. I’ll get it done for you.” That’s great, but it’s not what a leader does. A leader not only gets things done, but also engages in the overall planning process. Plan out the projects, identify the gaps, address the gaps, put the team together and more. If you want to lead, you also need to go extra miles to plan and strategize.

5. Share credit and recognize others’ contributions

One of the most important leadership traits is to appreciate other team members’ efforts. A sense of empathy goes far with your team members, such as a simple “thank you” and “please”. Recognize team members who go above and beyond. Everything we do in a corporation is teamwork. It’s OK to share credit, even though you do a good chunk of the work. It’s good karma. What comes around, goes around.

You don’t need a team to lead

As an individual contributor, your job is to demonstrate to senior managers that you have leadership traits and you think holistically. Find opportunities to showcase that whenever you can.

I recently completed my 2nd book, Effective Sales Enablement. This book is written from a marketer’s perspective on how to enable the sales team as a marketer. It’s not a leadership book per se. But if you are marketing leaders and are interested in how to plan and implement initiatives to better support your sales team, this book is for you.

Leadership is not only about leading or assembling a team. The core is about how we conduct ourselves and our ability to think and act strategically, being empathetic and getting things done.

Pam Didner is a marketing consultant, author, and speaker. Her second book, Effective Sales Enablement, provides unconventional insights into how marketing and sales can better work together. Her forte is creating and implementing marketing strategies by connecting sales and marketing to engage global audiences. For more information, please visit pamdidner.com.

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

The Power in Vulnerability

Guest post by Rick Miller:
 
“Never let them see you sweat.” Like many baby-boomers, I heard this and many other similar phrases growing up. The message was clear. Don’t show weakness because it will be exploited.

Fast forward to today and you see the opposite is true.
 
This shift may have started in 2010 when Brené Brown, a sociological research professor, published The Gifts of Imperfection, and perhaps took off with her next book Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead in 2012. Both were widely acclaimed and New York Times bestsellers.
 
I learned about the power of vulnerability years earlier.
 
When I took over as president of a $12 billion unit at AT&T—overseeing 10,000 employees and a huge budget—I thought I had all the power I needed to succeed. I was wrong.
 
One of my first challenges was to engage with employees to learn about the business and what they thought was holding us back. I quickly found those same employees viewed people like me (AT&T corporate officers) as part of the problem, if not the problem. I did find a number of workers who stepped up to lead, however. I call these people Chiefs. But most needed a little coaxing to embrace change and become fully engaged in charting a different future for our unit.

To break down those barriers, I held a number of town hall meetings as forums for frank and open discussion. It was at one such meeting in New York City where I learned about the power of vulnerability.
 
During a Q&A session an employee asked if, as a corporate officer, I truly understood the impact of losing health care benefits while a family member was battling cancer. The person was evaluating an early retirement program and was concerned about health care coverage options. From the question, I inferred that most of those in my audience assumed officers—like me—were somehow insulated from the impacts of voluntary retirement programs. The question provided an opportunity to share a personal vulnerability to illustrate that all AT&T employees—including leaders like me—shared many of their concerns and anxieties.
 
Although I never hid the fact that I was a type one diabetic, I had never publicly shared that I was also a cancer survivor. Years ago, while working at Sperry Corp, my doctor discovered a malignant tumor and recommended immediate surgery. At Sperry and later career stops, I had kept my cancer battle under wraps because I feared it would hold back my career advancement. Other than my boss and assistant, no one in my professional circles knew…until that fateful AT&T town hall meeting.
 
After I addressed the specific question (transition health care insurance would continue to cover his family), I took a risk. You could have heard a pin drop when I revealed, “I am a cancer survivor and know how important health insurance is.”
 
I deliberately put myself in a vulnerable position as a way to connect with my team. Although I didn’t realize it at the time, by exposing my vulnerability, I was actually being more courageous than muscling through my professional life without opening up about my bout with cancer.
 
The benefit of openly acknowledging the link between our personal and professional lives is huge. After my “aha moment,” more and more employees began to engage me in conversation. It was clear that the initial animosity I faced as an AT&T officer had eroded. As a result, more of my team members stepped up as leaders in the transformation.
 
From this experience, I was again reminded that title, position, and authority don’t automatically translate into power and influence. Rather, my vulnerability had made me more powerful and able to effect change. In turn, it boosted the impact and power of my team.
 
What choices can you make to become more powerful? What could you do to increase your impact and influence?
 
Rick Miller is an unconventional turnaround specialist, a servant leader, and a go-to Chief. He is also an experienced and trusted confidant, an author (Be Chief: It’s a Choice, Not a Title, September 4, Motivational Press), a sought-after speaker, and an expert at driving sustainable growth. For over 30 years, Rick served as a successful business executive in roles including President and/or CEO in a Fortune 10, a Fortune 30, a startup, and a nonprofit. Rick earned a bachelor’s degree from Bentley University and an MBA from Columbia. He currently lives in Morristown, NJ.If you would like to find out how to measure and increase your power, take this short free survey that Rick created.




Thursday, August 30, 2018

You Don’t Have to Be Gates (or Buffett) to Shake the World

Guest post from Steve Farber:

How do you become a great leader and a better person? Just do one simple thing: Help others achieve greatness. Here’s how.

Some of the world’s richest and most powerful people already know one thing you might not: philanthropy is so much more than a tax dodge. In fact, philanthropy is a way of showing that success is not measured by money alone, but by how money can help enrich the lives of others. 

You probably aren’t in the Forbes Billionaires List. (If you are, congratulations!) But you don’t need to be a billionaire or even have much money at all to fulfill a sense of mission to others. And if you succeed at that, your own success is absolutely guaranteed as well.

It’s not about the money; it’s about what and who you know. Leave the big-money contributions to the Gateses and Buffetts of the world. The rest of us can give our talent, time, knowledge, contacts – whatever resources we have – to other worthy people in our lives at work and at home.

I’ve made it my life’s work to pass along this message. In effect, you can make it your own, too, by treating everything you do as an act of philanthropy. Here are the three main tenets of what I like to call Greater Than Yourself:

1. Expand yourself. We expand ourselves in order to give to others.


2. Give yourself. Knowledge may be power, but the giving of knowledge is far more powerful because it enriches both the provider and receiver.

3. Replicate yourself. Teach others to do for other people exactly what you’ve done for them.

The principles of GTY are the foundation for a company culture in which everyone reaches out not just to help, but also to help each other excel. The role of a CEO is to ensure that everyone in the company becomes significantly greater as a result of working with one another. The CEO’s job is to lead the company, not to be the smartest, greatest, most talented person in the building. The ability to work well with others, tap into social networks, and draw on collective intelligence is critically important, adding to our knowledge of the world we live in.

My Greater Than Yourself philosophy is grounded in social network theory, which explores how the social processes involved in change are passed along between individuals and between managerial levels in an organization. This involves a shift from primarily focusing on the individual and individual attributes, to understanding the dynamic supports and constraints of the larger network in which the individual operates.

Diving In Deeper

Here are some details about each of these three tenets in the GTY process. Add your own items to the lists! 

1. Expand Yourself.

Take a personal inventory of:

· Things I do well

· Meaningful experiences I have had

· Life lessons I have learned

· People I know

· My admirable qualities

· My personal values

Then ask, what more can I do to improve the quality and depth of my experience and knowledge?

2. Give Yourself

Be clear on intentions to make a difference in others’ lives by offering all of one’s:

· Knowledge

· Connections

· Experience

· Insights

· Advice and counsel

· Life lessons

· Confidence

· Words and gestures of encouragement

3. Replicate Yourself


Ensure that GTY efforts expand far beyond one’s own relationships by:

· Making sure others understand that you expect nothing in return except that they take on GTY projects of their own

· Making sure they understand that their GTY project recipients will be required to take on GTY projects of their own

· Challenging everyone to practice GTY in their professional and personal lives

· Sharing one’s GTY successes and failures with others, so they can learn from your experience
By following the Greater Than Yourself, leaders will be empowered to help others—teammates, employees, and colleagues—become more capable, confident, and accomplished than they are themselves, and in the process achieve greater success in their personal and professional lives.


About The Author:


Steve Farber is author of GREATER THAN YOURSELF: The Ultimate Lesson of True Leadership and founder of The Extreme Leadership Institute, an organization devoted to changing the world through the cultivation and development of extreme leaders in business, nonprofits, education, and beyond. Listed on Inc.’s ranking of the Top 50 Leadership and Management Experts in the world, and #1 on Huffington Post’s 12 Business Speakers to See, Farber is a bestselling author, popular keynote speaker, and a seasoned leadership coach and consultant who has worked with a vast array of public and private organizations in virtually every arena. For more information, please visit www.stevefarber.com.